King Charles II (1630-1685) - Pt 1/3

King Charles II (1630-1685) - Pt 1/3

Episode 9 of the Channel Five series Kings & Queens, which looks at the life and reign of Charles II of England The series looks at key monarchs in the history of England and gives some simplified facts about their reigns. This is a good series for those who have little prior knowledge of English history

Kings And Queens 9 Charles The Second 1660 1685

Kings And Queens   9 Charles The Second 1660 1685

Anon.- William Douglas Of England, 1685: Annie Laurie

Anon.- William Douglas Of England, 1685: Annie Laurie

Provided to YouTube by Entertainment One Distribution US Anon.- William Douglas Of England, 1685: Annie Laurie · Alfred Deller & The Deller Consort Alfred Deller: The Complete Vanguard Classics Recordings - Folk Songs And Ballads ℗ Musical Concepts Released on: 2008-07-22 Auto-generated by YouTube.

Culture and Power in England, 1585 1685 Social History in Perspective

Culture and Power in England, 1585 1685 Social History in Perspective

Culture and Power in England, 1585 1685 Social History in Perspective

Culture and Power in England, 1585 1685 Social History in Perspective

King Edward I "Longshanks" (1239-1307) - Pt 1/3

King Edward I "Longshanks" (1239-1307) - Pt 1/3

Episode 3 of the Channel Five series Kings & Queens, which looks at the life and reign of Edward I of England also known as "Longshanks". The series looks at key monarchs in the history of England and gives some simplified facts about their reigns. This is a good series for those who have little prior knowledge of English history.

Zadok the Priest:The Coronation Anthem

Zadok the Priest:The Coronation Anthem

One of the last official acts of the reign of George I of Great Britain was to both naturalize George Frideric Handel as a British citizen and to commission Handel to write the coronation anthem for King George's son and successor, George II. As 1727 drew to a close, Britain had been enduring a generation's worth of political and religious turmoil. The union of Scotland and England was still tenuous at best, with many Scots and English Catholics (Jacobites by name) still supporting the line of the deposed King James II. When George I (of the House of Hanover) assumed the throne in 1714, he was hardly popular -- he spoke German and not English -- many Jacobites rose against him and joined James in rebellion. The rebellion was put down, but anti-Hanoverian sentiments still ran strong. George I looked to the Old Testament for a parallel to his situation, and found one in 1 Kings. The Bible told how King David of Israel, while nearing death was facing his own succession crisis. After some deliberation, he chose his son Solomon as his heir, rather than Solomon's ambitious half-brother Adonijah. In a grand ceremony, David's most trusted advisors, Zadok the priest and Nathan the prophet, annointed Solomon as king. George feared another Jacobite uprising (which nonetheless came in 1745), and wanted to use the spectacle of his son's coronation to establish George II as the legitimate ruler in the public's eye. Thus Handel was called upon to write an appropriately-grandiose set of anthems for the ceremony, and he didn't disappoint. Four anthems were sung that day: The King Shall Rejoice, Let Thy Hand Be Strengthened, My Heart Is Inditing and Zadok the Priest, but it is the last that has endured. Zadok the Priest was first sung during the annointing of George II during his coronation on 11 October 1727. It since has been sung at at every British coronation since 1727, the only anthem from Handel's four to endure the last three centuries. It is traditionally performed during the sovereign's anointing. The anthem is anything but subtle. Regal, yes. Ambitious, yes. But subtle? I'm afraid not. It is played in four-four time, and at a slow tempo (about 60 beats per minute), picking up to ~80 bpm at the first "God save the king". The anthem is written in seven-part SSAATBB harmony, sung in the key of D flat. The libretto was adapted from a Latin antiphon, "Unxerunt Salomonem Sadoc sacerdos". The running time of the piece can vary between 5:15 and 5:45, depending on the arrangement and conductor. The official website of The British Monarchy http://www.royal.gov.uk *Correction in the Timeline* Charles II's father King Charles I was executed at Whitehall on 30 January 1649, at the climax of the English Civil War. The English Parliament did not proclaim Charles II as king, and instead passed a statute that made any such proclamation unlawful. England entered the period known to history as the English Interregnum or the English Commonwealth and the country was a de facto republic, led by Oliver Cromwell. The Parliament of Scotland, however, proclaimed Charles II king on 5 February 1649 in Edinburgh. He was crowned King of Scotland at Scone on 1 January 1651. Following his defeat by Cromwell at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651, Charles fled to mainland Europe and spent the next nine years in exile in France, the United Provinces and the Spanish Netherlands. A political crisis following the death of Cromwell in 1658 resulted in Charles being invited to return and assume the throne in what became known as the Restoration. Charles II arrived on English soil on 27 May 1660 and entered London on his 30th birthday, 29 May 1660. After 1660, all legal documents were dated as if Charles had succeeded his father in 1649. Charles was crowned King of England and Ireland at Westminster Abbey on 23 April 1661 and reigned until 1685.

Elizabeth R Part 5 (BBC 1971) The Enterprise of England

Elizabeth R Part 5 (BBC 1971) The Enterprise of England

Whispers of war fill the air in Elizabeth's court and in Spain. The infirm King Philip II of Spain is eager to avenge the death of Mary, Queen of Scots, (and incidentally, make good on his inheritance from Mary as the Catholic claimant to the English throne - which Mary bequeathed to him). Philip urges an unprepared fleet, commanded by the incompetent Duke of Medina Sidonia, to sail on England. Even as Elizabeth rebukes the hawks (privateers) in her council (both Walsingham and Sir Francis Drake), with hopes of peace (encouraged by Cecil, who is now Lord Burghley), the Spanish Armada appears on the horizons of England. Her fate and the future of the country now lie in the hands of Drake, and the Navy. England triumphs, but Elizabeth pays a heavy emotional price with the death of her beloved Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester

King Edward III (1312-1377)

King Edward III (1312-1377)

Clip from the History File, which discusses the life and reign of King Edward III of England

James VI and I of Scotland England and Ireland 1566–1625

James VI and I of Scotland England and Ireland 1566–1625

James VI and I (James Charles Stuart; 19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death. The kingdoms of Scotland and England were individual sovereign states, with their own parliaments, judiciary, and laws, though both were ruled by James in personal union. James was the son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and a great-great-grandson of Henry VII, King of England and Lord of Ireland, positioning him to eventually accede to all three thrones. Thank you for watching My pinterest page http://www.pinterest.com/bexsi123 My twitter page https://twitter.com/mizbex85 My goodreads page https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/3878347-rebecca

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